City of Milton Keynes

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City of Milton Keynes
Motto(s): 
By knowledge, design and understanding
City of Milton Keynes, shown within Buckinghamshire and England
City of Milton Keynes, shown within Buckinghamshire and England
Coordinates: 52°07′N 0°46′W / 52.117°N 0.767°W / 52.117; -0.767Coordinates: 52°07′N 0°46′W / 52.117°N 0.767°W / 52.117; -0.767
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
RegionSouth East England
Ceremonial countyBuckinghamshire
Admin HQMilton Keynes
Founded1 April 1997
Government
 • TypeUnitary authority
 • Governing bodyMilton Keynes City Council
 • MPsIain Stewart (C) (Milton Keynes South)
Ben Everitt (C) (Milton Keynes North)
Area
 • Total119 sq mi (309 km2)
Population
 (2011 Census)
 • Total248,821[1]
 • Estimate 
(mid-2019 est.)
269,457[2]
 • Rank58th (of 309)
Time zoneUTC+0 (Greenwich Mean Time)
Postcode
Area code01908
ONS code00MG
Websitewww.milton-keynes.gov.uk

The City of Milton Keynes is a unitary authority area with both borough and city status, in Buckinghamshire.[3] It is the northernmost district of the South East England Region. The borough abuts Bedfordshire, Northamptonshire and the remainder of Buckinghamshire.[a]

The principal built-up area in the borough is the Milton Keynes urban area, which accounts for about 20% of its area and 90% of its population. The ONS's provisional return from the 2021 census reports that the population of the borough has reached approximately 287,000.[4]

History[edit]

The local authority was created on 1 April 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972, as a District under the (then) Buckinghamshire County Council, by the merger of Bletchley Urban District, Newport Pagnell Urban District, Newport Pagnell Rural District and Wolverton Urban District, together with that part of Wing Rural District within the designated New Town area. The district council applied for and received borough status that year. It was originally one of five non-metropolitan districts of Buckinghamshire. On 1 April 1997, it became a self-governing non-metropolitan county,[5] independent from (the former) Buckinghamshire County Council.[b]

In August 2022, the council received letters patent giving the Borough the status of a city.[3]

Local government[edit]

Arising from the local government elections of May 2021, the borough is governed by a Labour and Liberal Democrat coalition administration. The Conservative Party is the main opposition group.

The political composition of the council is as follows.

Affiliation Councillors
Conservative Party 23
Labour Party 20
Liberal Democrats 14

The 2022 local election did not change the status of the council from 'no overall control'. No political party has had an 'overall majority' on the council since 2006.

Economy[edit]

According to data from the Office of National Statistics for 2017, the borough was the highest performing NUTS3 region in the UK outside inner London (which takes the first five places), on the basis of gross value added per head.[6]

Education[edit]

Further education in the borough is provided by Milton Keynes College. For higher education, the Open University's headquarters are in Milton Keynes – though, as this is a distance education institution, the only students resident on campus are approximately 200 full-time postgraduates. A campus of the University of Bedfordshire located in Central Milton Keynes, provides conventional undergraduate courses.

Cranfield University is the academic partner in project with Milton Keynes Council to establish a new university, code-named "MK:U", on a reserved site in the city centre.[7] As of January 2022, the project is stalled pending assurance of government funding.[8]

Demographics[edit]

Population[edit]

Population trend of borough and Urban Area 1801–2021
Population of Milton Keynes (unitary authority area) in 2020

At the 2011 census, the population of the borough was 248,821.[1] The ONS's provisional return from the 2021 census reports that the population of the borough has reached approximately 287,000.[4]

In the same census, 52.8% of the borough's population registered their religion as Christian and 37.9% as not religious or none given. 4.8% of the population follow Islam and a little over 2.8% are Hindu, with no other religion above one percent.[9]

The borough's population age profile is slightly younger than England's average, with half of the borough's population aged under 35 years old.[9] The 30- to 39-year-olds in the borough formed as the largest 10-year age group of the population with 30- to 34-year-olds being the largest 5-year age group, 22.3% are aged under 16 and just 11.1% are aged over 65 compared.[9]

Levels of educational attainment in the borough are slightly higher than the England average. 18% have no qualifications compared with 22.5% in England, while 28.2% have a degree or higher qualification compared with 27.4% in England.[9]

Ethnicity[edit]

In the 2021 census, almost 71.8% of the population described their ethnic origin as white, 12.3% as Asian, 9.7% as black, 4% as mixed, and 2% as another ethnic group.[10]

Ethnic Group Year
1991[11] 2001[12] 2011[13] 2021[10]
Number % Number % Number % Number %
White: Total 166,101 94.2% 187,852 90.7% 199,094 80% 206,114 71.8%
White: British 179,694 86.8% 183,934 73.9% 178,568 62.2%
White: Irish 2,918 2,498 2,382 0.8%
White: Gypsy or Irish Traveller 72 156 0.1%
White: Roma 578 0.2%
White: Other 5,240 12,590 5.1% 24,430 8.5%
Asian or Asian British: Total 5,982 3.4% 9,406 4.5% 22,782 9.2% 35,645 12.3%
Asian or Asian British: Indian 2,861 1.6% 3,967 1.9% 8,106 3.3% 15,348 5.3%
Asian or Asian British: Pakistani 822 1,682 3,851 7163 2.5%
Asian or Asian British: Bangladeshi 694 1,072 1,989 3189 1.1%
Asian or Asian British: Chinese 667 1,835 2,722 1.1% 2913 1.0%
Asian or Asian British: Other Asian 938 850 6,114 2.5% 7,032 2.4%
Black or Black British: Total 2,869 1.6% 4,986 2.4% 17,131 6.9% 27,851 9.7%
Black or Black British: African 523 2,596 13,058 5.2% 21,502 7.5%
Black or Black British: Caribbean 1,665 1,956 2,524 2,975 1.0%
Black or Black British: Other Black 681 434 1,549 3,374 1.2%
Mixed or British Mixed: Total 3,716 1.8% 8,235 3.3% 11,725 4%
Mixed: White and Black Caribbean 1,347 2,243 2,997 1.0%
Mixed: White and Black African 477 1,597 2,551 0.9%
Mixed: White and Asian 1,037 2,228 2,973 1.0%
Mixed: Other Mixed 855 2,167 3,204 1.1%
Other: Total 1,378 0.8% 1,097 0.5% 1,579 0.6% 5,725 2%
Other: Arab 565 1349 0.5%
Other: Any other ethnic group 1,378 0.8% 1,097 0.5% 1,014 0.4% 4376 1.5%
Ethnic minority: Total 10,229 5.8% 19,205 9.3% 49,727 20% 80,946 28%
Total 176,330 100% 207,057 100% 248,821 100% 287,060 100%

Religion[edit]

In the 2011 census, 62% of the population professed a religious belief. Christianity was the largest denomination, with 53% of the total.[9] At the 2021 census, again 62% professed a religious belief. Christianity remained the largest denomination but its share (of a greater population) fell to 43% of the total.[14]

Religion 2001[15] 2011[16] 2021[14]
Number % Number % Number %
Holds religious beliefs 145,983 70.5 154,444 62.1 178,107 43.05
Gold Christian Cross no Red.svg Christian 135,715 65.5 131,352 52.8 122,935 42.8
Dharma Wheel.svg Buddhist 747 0.4 1,246 0.5 1,404 0.5
Om.svg Hindu 2,596 1.3 6,918 2.8 12,911 4.5
Star of David.svg Jewish 466 0.2 427 0.1 383 0.1
Star and Crescent.svg Muslim 4,843 2.3 11,913 4.8 20,484 7.1
Khanda.svg Sikh 795 0.4 1,372 0.6 1,959 0.7
Other religion 821 0.4 1,216 0.5 1,558 0.5
No religion and Religion not stated 61,074 29.5 94,377 37.9 108,953 38.0
Total population 207,057 100.0 248,821 100.0 287,060 100.0

Housing and home ownership[edit]

In 2011, Milton Keynes had the greatest proportion of shared ownership homes in England, 6.1%, compared with second-placed London boroughs of Hounslow and Tower Hamlets with 2.4%. This form of home ownership has been a planning policy of the Council soon after the settled acceptance of all major UK lenders on specified forms of this type of property ownership was agreed in the 2000s decade.

The borough has relatively high home ownership at 72.8% of dwellings with the remaining 16.2% of homes are privately rented and 11.0% are socially rented.[17]

At the 2012, 16.2% of the population lived in flats (apartments), compared with the 22.1% average for England.[9]

Public health[edit]

According to Public Health England, "The health of people in Milton Keynes is generally similar to the England average. About 15.1% (8,680) children live in low income families. Life expectancy for both men and women is similar to the England average."[18]

Settlements[edit]

Milton Keynes (urban area)[edit]

The urban area accounts for about 20% of the borough by area and 90% by population. This is a partial list of the districts of the Milton Keynes urban area.

The City of Milton Keynes is fully parished. These are the parishes, and the districts they contain, that are now elements of the Milton Keynes built-up area as defined by the Office for National Statistics.[19][c] Bletchley, Fenny Stratford, Woburn Sands, Central Milton Keynes, Newport Pagnell, Wolverton and Stony Stratford are all towns.

Rest of the borough[edit]

The rural area accounts for about 80% of the borough by area and about 10% by population. Olney is a town. These are the extra-urban civil parishes:

Freedom of the City[edit]

The following people and military units have received the Freedom of the City (from 2022) or Freedom of the Borough (1982–2021).

Individuals[edit]

Military Units[edit]

Organisations and businesses[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Milton Keynes Local Authority (E06000042)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 29 December 2018.
  2. ^ "Population Estimates for UK, England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Mid-2019". Office for National Statistics. 6 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Crown Office | The Gazette". www.thegazette.co.uk. Retrieved 19 August 2022.
  4. ^ a b "Population and household estimates, England and Wales: Census 2021". Office for National Statistics. July 2022.
  5. ^ "The Buckinghamshire (Borough of Milton Keynes) (Structural Change) Order 1995". Government of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 15 July 2020. (2) A new county shall be constituted comprising the area of Milton Keynes and shall be named the county of Milton Keynes.
  6. ^ Statistical bulletin: Regional gross value added (balanced), UK: 1998 to 2017 (table 7) (Report). Office of National Statistics. 12 December 2018.
  7. ^ "Project Two: MK:U A new University for Milton Keynes". MK2050 Futures Commission. October 2017. Retrieved 6 February 2019.
  8. ^ "Milton Keynes: New university project for 2023 delayed". BBC News. 7 January 2022. Retrieved 15 February 2022.
  9. ^ a b c d e f UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Milton Keynes Local Authority (E06000042)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  10. ^ a b "Ethnic group - Office for National Statistics". www.ons.gov.uk. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  11. ^ Data is taken from United Kingdom Casweb Data services of the United Kingdom 1991 Census on Ethnic Data for England, Scotland and Wales (Table 6)
  12. ^ "Office of National Statistics; 2001 Census Key Statistics". webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  13. ^ "2011 Census: Ethnic Group, local authorities in England and Wales". webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  14. ^ a b "Religion | Census 2021 | Dataset ID: TS030". Office for National Statistics. 29 November 2022. Retrieved 5 December 2022.
  15. ^ "KS007 - Religion - Nomis - 2001". www.nomisweb.co.uk. Retrieved 18 October 2022.
  16. ^ "KS209EW (Religion) - Nomis - 2011". www.nomisweb.co.uk. Retrieved 18 October 2022.
  17. ^ 2011 Census Key Statistics: Tenure. Office for National Statistics
  18. ^ "Local Authority Health Profile 2019: Milton Keynes". Public Health England. 2019. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  19. ^ UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Milton Keynes Built-up area (E34005056)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 29 March 2019. (includes map of the built-up area).
  20. ^ a b c d e f David Tooley (15 May 2020). "Tories want key workers in Milton Keynes to be awarded freedom of the borough". Milton Keynes Citizen. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  21. ^ "Football boss 'overwhelmed' by award". BBC News. 22 August 2015.
  22. ^ "Proud city centre military march to commemorate Freedom of the Borough - Milton Keynes Council". www.milton-keynes.gov.uk.
  23. ^ "Congratulations to MK's Leah Williamson and The Lionesses". Milton Keynes Council. 1 August 2022.
  24. ^ "Rifles squadron rewarded for service with 'Freedom of Milton Keynes' honour". ITV News. 11 March 2018.
  1. ^ The remainder of Buckinghamshire is also Unitary Authority and is controlled by Buckinghamshire Council.
  2. ^ The existing Buckinghamshire County Council and the non-metropolitan districts of Aylesbury Vale, Chiltern, South Bucks, and Wycombe in Buckinghamshire were replaced by a single unitary authority known as Buckinghamshire Council, on 1 April 2020.
  3. ^ This list excludes the civil parishes of Aspley Guise and Aspley Heath which, despite being in the contiguous built-up area, are in Central Bedfordshire and thus outside the City of Milton Keynes.

External links[edit]